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Why Women? Inclusive Security and Peaceful Societies – Inclusive Security

Photo: Lai Seng Sin/AP Traditional approaches to ending wars—where armed groups meet behind closed doors to hammer out a truce—are falling short in the face of 21st century conflicts. The number of armed conflicts has been increasing over the past decade. In 2014 the world witnessed the highest battle-related death toll since the Cold War.1 […]

Traditional approaches to ending wars—where armed groups meet behind closed doors to hammer out a truce—are falling short in the face of 21st century conflicts. The number of armed conflicts has been increasing over the past decade. In 2014 the world witnessed the highest battle-related death toll since the Cold War.1 Belligerents increasingly target civilians, and global displacement from conflict, violence, and persecution has reached the highest level ever recorded.2 As new forms of conflict demand innovative responses, states that have emerged from war also persistently relapse. In the 2000s, 90 percent of conflicts occurred in countries already afflicted by war; the rate of relapse has increased every decade since the 1960s.3 Empirical analysis of eight decades of international crises shows that peace-making efforts often succeed in the short term only to fail in the quest for long-term peace.4

Partly as a means to address these challenges, calls for inclusive approaches to resolving conflict and insecurity have grown louder. In the field of international development, decades of evidence of women’s positive impact on socioeconomic outcomes has changed the way governments, donors, and aid organizations do their work. The same cannot be said for the field of peace and security, where women have been thoroughly and consistently excluded. Despite a crescendo of calls for women’s participation in decision making surrounding peace and security over the last two decades, change has been slow to follow. For example, women made up just two percent of mediators and nine percent of negotiators in official peace talks between 1992 and 2011.5 And just two percent of funding dedicated to peace and security goes to gender equality or women’s empowerment.6

The full impact of women’s participation on peace and security outcomes remains poorly understood.7 But a recent increase in quantitative and qualitative research has the potential to transform the status quo. In outlining the existing data, this brief shows how women’s inclusion helps prevent conflict, create peace, and sustain security after war ends.

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Source: Why Women? Inclusive Security and Peaceful Societies – Inclusive Security

Category : Kickass Fems, Lysistrata.
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